Migrants, starting with the training course for Intercultural Driving Instructor

Tuesday 14 December 2010

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Clarity meetingEvery year in Italy on Italian roads and motorways, foreign nationals involved in accidents or in serious fatalities are about 20% of the total, with peaks touching 25%. Considering that, in our country the immigrants, and also not regular immigrants, reaching a rate of about 10%; so immigrants are involved in road accidents proportionately almost twice as much to the Italian population.

The achievement of a driving license is definitely one of the factors that, as well as enabling autonomy on movements, increases the chance of obtaining a job. In particular for migrants it is often precisely requested to be in possession of a driving license.

Current law allows only in special cases to convert a driving licenses issued in the country of origin as a valid document in our country.

In Italy there are no institutional bodies dealing with migrant support in this sector. It is actually the voluntary sector that takes the load of these needs, first looking for filling language gaps. Nevertheless, it remains a teaching approach that is not sensitive enough towards cultural and linguistic characteristics of the migrant users. This is the result of learning difficulties mentioned above.

The idea is to train a new profile of professional – through the CLARITY project able to teach technical skills to support the achievement of a driving license in the language of origin of migrant participants.

The international meeting CLARITY held in Palermo on December 1st and 2nd has allowed the partners to plan the methodological approach to apply for the training course addressed to migrant workers, starting from January 2011.

For further information please contact partnership@cesie.org.

Rethinking autonomy without acronyms: reflections from the local training

Rethinking autonomy without acronyms: reflections from the local training

CIVILHOOD addressed the autonomy of young migrants, emphasizing the complexity of their experiences and the need for flexible approaches. Challenges include the difficulty in defining autonomy and the impact of the dynamics of reception on their growth and integration. The CIVILHOOD project has developed educational resources to support practitioners and volunteers in addressing these challenges.

CESIE